My Stream

CThroughout the year,

The stream flows,

Often in fits and starts,

Passive and turgid,

But mostly in tune

With climes and seasons.

 

In wintry mornings,

In the limpid light

Of a pale sun,

The stream lies sluggish

With chunks of ice

Floating listlessly

Or lying in wait

For the dormant life

To revive and breathe again;

Dry leaves and dead branches

Lay crisscross

Amid brackish water,

Reminders of spent lives.

 

Then life blows in

And spring sprouts green gold

Which peep out

With first life

Of thoughts shaking off slumber.

The stream awakens

In gurgling movements

That swirls over

The debris of last year

And moved like  a slithering fabric

Of light and shadow.

Feelings begin to churn,

Up from long wait,

To the full life of summer

When greens wax to lushness

And torrents of emotions

Seethe  in full strength.

 

The gentle stream chortles

And rushes out

In froth and laughter

With the strength and noise

Of life’s calls

Which spell out

Churning passions

And wayward thoughts.

In the fullness of summer,

The stream’s flow is intense

And floods break out

In tumultuous fuss

To break out in excess

To submerge the roads

In roiling waves.

 

Time passes and passions cool

After trees are decked

In fiery shades

Till leaves let go,

One by one,

Their holds on trees

To descend in submissive landing.

 

Life’s currents slow down

And the turbulence is paced down

With the subsiding stream;

The dormant life of freezing time

Is gently creeping in

And the vivacious stream

Enters a reflective retreat.

Winter’s slumberous stillness

Ventures to keep in check

The roiling passions

In a temporary vise

To play the reel of seasons

Once again…

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “My Stream

  1. I had never really thought about the specific way that the streams go through the seasonal changes. You did a wonderful job with your descriptive presentation of the passive winter, awakening spring, rushing floods and then the slowing down of the water in late summer and fall before the stream becomes passive and frozen in winter again.
    Well done!
    Liz

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